Science helps us understand the threats we face, but bold policies to fight climate change and extinction depend on our language, art, and experience with the natural world.

Science helps us understand the threats we face, but bold policies to fight climate change and extinction depend on our language, art, and experience with the natural world.

Science helps us understand the threats we face, but bold policies to fight climate change and extinction depend on our language, art, and experience with the natural world.

TOP STORIES

A woman in a hard hat and yellow vest tossed seed from a bag onto a rocky landscape.

As the dams come down, crews prepare for miles of new vegetation to rise up. That starts with thousands of tiny acorns.

Incinerator next to houses

With a lack of regulations addressing toxic “forever chemicals,” students and professors at a Vermont college have taken their research skills into communities to spur action.

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HEADLINES

Cheetah running in low brown grass

Conservationists in Namibia have found the fate of people and cheetahs are closely intertwined — and so are solutions to help both.

This elusive predator’s stripes act as camouflage, but that’s not enough to protect them from poachers and habitat loss.

Ongoing research finds that trashcans can feed and boost crow populations, which comes with a potentially deadly cost for some other bird species.

River winds through rocky canyon with grasses

Conservationists agree that Oregon’s Owyhee Canyonlands are an ecologically important area, but how to protect them isn’t as simple.

Adult and baby grizzly walk through high grass

Wildlife ecologist Bruce McLellan lived in the remote Flathead Valley in Canada and followed some bears for upwards of 30 years. 

A lone bison stands atop dry grass in front of leafless trees.

Supporting the reintroduction of buffalo on Tribal lands in the United States and Canada requires international, interagency cooperation.

Tapir walking on the beach

This little-known neotropical megafauna offers hope for boosting conservation and fighting climate change.

White coral underwater with person swimming above

Scientists warn that rising sea surface temperatures and more frequent marine heat waves will have profound effects on ocean dwellers.

Adult and baby elephants in tall grass.

The world’s largest land mammals are finding ways to navigate a landscape that’s becoming increasingly developed.

ABOUT

environmental newsThe Revelator, an environmental news and commentary initiative of the Center for Biological Diversity, provides editorially independent reporting, analysis and stories at the intersection of politics, conservation, art, culture, endangered species, climate change, economics and the future of wild species, wild places and the planet.