A parklet in Washington DC with brightly colored planters filled with local pollinator plants.

From pocket parks to large-scale projects, cities around the world are working to reverse a troubling trend.

A parklet in Washington DC with brightly colored planters filled with local pollinator plants.

From pocket parks to large-scale projects, cities around the world are working to reverse a troubling trend.

TOP STORIES

Meryl McMaster poses in a self portrait in a vast landscape.

The Canadian photographer travels to remote areas to explore identity and our relationship with nature.

Moby with movie poster

The musician’s new documentary, Punk Rock Vegan Movie, shines a light on a hidden history of the animal-rights movement.

Sign up to get The Revelator’s weekly newsletter

HEADLINES

A tiny brown and white, hairy butterfly sits in dry grass

These butterflies are no longer present in their namesake range, but a collaboration aims to bring them back.

A Uros woman in colorful skirt and jacket stands amidst drying reeds

Persistent drought has caused havoc for the Indigenous peoples who live on floating islands and depend on rains that have stopped falling.

A green sea turtle underwater.

Researchers in Barbados found that ecotourism sea-turtle encounters created some very human problems for the animals.

A row of wind turbines rise out of the ocean

As wind energy develops in the Atlantic Ocean, experts unite to ensure it’s done in the most eco-friendly and environmentally responsible way.

The North American plants look pretty, but they also causes havoc in places where humans have allowed them to spread.

Hundreds if not thousands of birds sit in or near the water in a wetlands while a mountain looms behind them

Agriculture drained this ecosystem. Now, under the specter of future drought, the same systems have started to bring back both water and wildlife.

A sheet of stamps depicting endangered species

One scientist’s passion for owl stamps shows: It’s not just about the collection. It’s about what you do with it.

A collage of photos: Brazil flooding, guinea pig, red and black frog, legless lizard

Rising sea levels may cause the local extinction of three small, threatened vertebrates in southern Brazil.

Two hands cup a pile of wood pellets

Wood-pellet companies have devastated forests in the Southeast and New England. Now they’re looking to expand.

ABOUT

environmental newsThe Revelator, an environmental news and commentary initiative of the Center for Biological Diversity, provides editorially independent reporting, analysis and stories at the intersection of politics, conservation, art, culture, endangered species, climate change, economics and the future of wild species, wild places and the planet.